Local DAR Chapter Honors Area Students for Citizenship, Essays

By Submitted Report | Posted in: Announcements

Students from area schools were recognized for their citizenship and scholarship this month by the Queen Alliquippa Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Spokeswoman Sharon Wallhausen said the local chapter of the DAR, founded in McKeesport in 1911, recently reinstituted its Good Citizen Award program. This year's winner is Owen Meilander (above right), a senior at Elizabeth Forward High School, shown with Maria Ferguson, regent of the Queen Alliquippa Chapter.

Meilander was recognized during a meeting at Norwin Public Library. His name will be submitted to the DAR's Pennsylvania State Competition, Wallhausen said.

Other finalists, who were nominated by their schools for the award, included Julia Conway, Gateway High School; Dana Ewing, Norwin High School; Kayley Bayne, Franklin Regional High School; Ashley Sandella, Serra Catholic High School; and Samuel Wilshire, Redeemer Lutheran School.

The DAR Good Citizen Award program and scholarship contest is intended to encourage and reward the qualities of good citizenship including dependability (truthfulness, loyalty and punctuality); service (cooperation, courtesy and consideration of others); leadership (personality, self-control and ability to assume responsibility); and patriotism (which includes unselfish interest in family, school, community and nation) to an outstanding degree.

Students are also evaluated on their grades and are required to write an essay during a timed, monitored two-hour session, Wallhausen said. Students do not know the topic of the essay until the session begins, she said.

Four Students Receive American History Award

Also honored by the Queen Alliquippa Chapter were four students from Mother of Sorrows School in Murrysville who competed in the American History Essay Contest.

Winners included Marielle Wilson, fifth grade (above left) and Michael Christlieb, sixth grade (above right).

Also honored were Liam J. O'Connor (seventh grade) and Adrianna Battaglia (eighth grade).

This year's essay was themed to the topic of the 100th anniversary of World War I, then called "the Great War." Wallhausen said students were asked to imagine living in 1918. Essays were judged on their historical accuracy, adherence to topic, organization of material, interest, originality, spelling, grammar, punctuation and neatness, she said.

Each winner received an American history essay pin, a certificate and a novel about the American Revolution. The local winners also advance to the statewide competition, Wallhausen said.

Originally published March 11, 2018.

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